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Marketing 38 min read September 27, 2019

How To Create A Perfect Newsletter And Get 60% Open Rate: Asking Experts

How To Create A Perfect Newsletter And Get 60% Open Rate: Asking Experts
Stacy Mine
Stacy Mine
Editor at Serpstat
Do you start to panic every time you need to send a newsletter? Don't worry — I have some tips and tricks that'll turn all your emails into successful campaigns. Be careful, because after reading the article you won't have the right to send an annoying email :)

In this post, experts will tell you about ways to encourage non-active users, fight spam, and share useful hacks.

Format: what newsletter types exist and what they serve for

Before sending your first email, you should clearly understand what newsletter types exist and what they serve for. First, answer the question: what is the primary goal of your newsletter? Would you like to inform your readers about something, to sell something or to invite them to an event? Here are the most common types of e-mails:
1
Traditional newsletter. A traditional newsletter contains the latest news or blog posts. Alternatively, you may receive an email with the most popular articles or a monthly digest. Usually, you will receive these letters with the same interval: for example, once a week or every two weeks. This newsletter type is a great way to let your readers know that you've posted new articles on the blog. These newsletters generate traffic on your site.
2
An email containing information about a specific event or product. This includes announcements of new features or services (for agencies and product companies.) These emails can be sent both periodically and occasionally.
3
Trigger email gets the user when he has made a specific action: registered, left a cart, made an order, etc. Our survey has clearly shown that trigger emails are often sent as a private message. By the way, the open rate of trigger emails is higher than average.
4
Discounts, promotions, offers. This newsletter type is also trendy among the recipients and has a higher open rate compared to informative emails.
5
Surveys on products, services, or topic suggestions that are used to communicate between senders and recipients.
6
Instructions, e-books and white papers can be sent both after the user's registration and occasionally.
Depending on the goals of the newsletter, these types are successfully combined. So, combine different email types, and your readers will never be bored.

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Design: how should the newsletter look like

Subject line

As you know, your subscribers receive tons of emails. That's why you only have one chance to grab the attention of your readers. Experts don't recommend writing long subject lines: 60-70 characters is enough. Also, keep in mind the fact that your emails should look good on mobile devices. To check this, just send a test e-mail.

The subject should be understandable and inform the reader about the content. Also avoid traditional spam words like "cheap", "free", "last chance" etc. Also, you should alternate the subject lines so they won't bore your readers. "The best blog articles of September" is dull and only worsen the open rate. It is essential to motivate the subscriber to open your letter. This motivation can be achieved in different ways: through scarcity/by curiosity/through personalization and emojis.

Our survey has shown that the majority of editors like to use emojis in the subject line or in the body of the newsletter.

Greeting

There are several variants:

  • formal greeting (Dear Sir/Dear Mrs)
  • first name and last name
  • only last name
  • with an impersonal welcome (hello!)
The main thing is to pick one that's right for your target audience.

Most newsletter editors use personalized greetings when their subscribers are segmented. Nevertheless, be careful! If you're not sure that the recipient names are displayed correctly in your newsletter tool, avoid using names in the e-mail.

Content

The content should be created following the goals you want to achieve. If you want to generate traffic to the site, the latest blog posts, an e-book or white paper are suitable for this purpose. If you're going to expand the community, then edit content from your blog for your target audience, create unique posts (e.g., in the form of storytelling) or invite to a thematic event.

Footer

If your emails are anonymous, you will never gain the trust of your recipients. Show that you are a real person. The footer should contain imprint, name and contact details of the sender. Don't forget to include the link so that the recipient can unsubscribe from your newsletter if necessary.
 

Interactive elements

Interactive elements help you to catch attention to your newsletter and keep the reader interested. You can include some of the following stuff:

  • videos
  • GIF animations
  • image carousels
  • quizzes
  • contests, etc.

Nevertheless, be careful because these elements can extend the loading time or can be displayed incorrectly. Therefore, check if GIFs and other creative elements look good statically and are informative.

Mobile optimized newsletters

Mobile optimization is not only one of the hottest trends now but one of the strictest requirements that should be met. The majority of your subscribers are sure to check their emails when they're on the go. Make sure your newsletter looks good on smartphones or tablets. The loading time should also be adjusted. No one wants to wait a long time for an image to load.

Spam: how do you avoid it?

1
The recipients of your e-mails must give clear consent to receive the newsletter.
2
Write unique emails that don't always have the same shape or content.

3
Send your newsletter via secure servers and regularly check the spam score of your mailings.
4
Avoid uppercase letters, exclamation points, spam words and phrases.

5
Don't forget about the text. No matter how good a picture looks, your newsletter must contain relevant text.

Perfect newsletter: experts' opinion

We asked marketing experts several questions about their newsletters:

1. What services to use to send newsletters
2. How often they send them
3. How to personalize e-mails
4. How to encourage inactive users
5. How to fight spam
6. How to track analytics

They also shared some useful advice, so keep reading!

What service do you use to send newsletters?

We use MailChimp.
Erin Simmons
We use Drip for our newsletters.
Talia Wolf
We mostly use Mailchimp for our marketing newsletters.
Alfred Lua
I tried many softwares and finally arrived at the solution that suits my needs best - Moosend.
Kas Szatylowicz
We currently use Act-On for our marketing automation and newsletter deployment and use Salesforce for our CRM.
Cathy McPhillips
At Digital Olympus, we use MailChimp. There, we set up email marketing sequences when, for example, we're giving away tickets to our conference.
Alex Tachalova
We use Intercom to send our newsletters.
Marcus Svensson
I mainly use ConvertKit.
Adam Connell
We previously used Hubspot but shifted to ActiveCampaign.
Manvi Agarwal
At the moment, I primarily use Sendlane and GetResponse.
Nico Prins
We use ActiveCampaign.
Josh Gallant
I use ConvertKit.
Joe Williams

How often do you send your newsletters?

Once a month to an entire distro and 2 - 3 times a month to segmented interest groups.
Erin Simmons
It depends on the site, but for BloggingWizard.com it's usually once a week.
Adam Connell
We have a weekly newsletter, which I send every Monday. I also email a segment of our list whenever we publish a new blog post. Currently, this happens two to three times a week. In total, I email our list about three to four times a week, depending on how many new blog posts we publish.
Alfred Lua
We send daily newsletters, and also have a weekly digest version that runs on Fridays. Subscribers can select the daily or the weekly, and many subscribe to both. Our Friday edition includes an exclusive letter from our Chief Strategy Advisor, so it provides something our readers won't find anywhere else.
Cathy McPhillips
Most of the time newsletters go out weekly.
Kas Szatylowicz
We send out newsletters every 15 days.
Manvi Agarwal
Once a week we send an email to our audience but we also have different campaigns set up according to different actions people take on the site. So people may receive more than one email a week.
Talia Wolf
To be honest, not as often as I should. The only excuse I have is that we try to minimize the number of emails we sent out so that our users really look forward to our newsletter.
Alex Tachalova
Email frequency is a controversial topic among email marketing experts. I believe that there isn't a perfect number here, still to keep our recipients happy and not overwhelmed with our emails we, at Albacross, tend to send our newsletters bi-weekly.
Marcus Svensson
The number of emails that I send to people varies depending on what segment/ list they are on. Most people get an email once a week. On some lists, I email people a lot less frequently, maybe once a month or less.
Nico Prins
We send anywhere from 1 to 3 campaigns per week. We also have automated welcome sequences that trigger after a contact joins the list, so this could climb to 4 or 5 per week at times.
Josh Gallant
For traditional newsletters, it's ether monthly, or twice per month. Although I have evergreen sequences where a new subscriber will get a flurry of emails in a short space of time.
Joe Williams

What types of newsletters do you use?

Kas Szatylowicz
The newsletters I send out from my personal blog simply inform my subscribers about the newest articles. When working with clients who sell products/services, the newsletters naturally vary from educational to promotional ones.
Alex Tachalova
Mostly informational and promotional ones. However, I always try to make my emails look natural by telling stories. For instance, if I need to promote something I try to tell a story from my life that is somehow related to the promoted activity and, this way, persuade our readers to check out the promo.
Marcus Svensson
We use emails as a tool to add value and build relationships. All our newsletters are in a plain text format. I think that the best way to drive engagement through the newsletters it to make them super simple for our subscribers. Let's take Brian Dean's newsletters for example. It's a plain, readable and mega-short text, no images, usually only one link, and straightforward subject line.
Talia Wolf
I do stripped-down HTML, it's more personal, easier to read and has consistently performed better than designed emails. We send weekly emails with articles, guides, worksheets and many free conversion optimization resources people can use to optimize their websites and we also send invite to live workshops, AMAs and more.
Adam Connell
I send a weekly/bi-weekly newsletter to my subscribers with links to our latest blog posts and additional insights when relevant.
This sometimes includes direct links to additional resources - particularly if we've published an article with a content upgrade, or some form of subscriber-only content. We'll occasionally include deals, or other recommendations.
Joe Williams
Our newsletters include industry news recaps, recent blog posts and new trial lead nurture sequences.
Manvi Agarwal
We focus on reader-base type of newsletters that focuses on what would interest the subscribers.
Josh Gallant
Our emails are always text-based. We may sprinkle in an image or GIF every now and then, but our goal is to send emails that look like the ones you'd get from a friend or colleague.
Nico Prins
The emails I send are usually related to a specific offer rather than a general email regarding content that was recently published on the site. I want the content I send to have value to the people who read them.

Do you personalize your emails? How?

We send emails out to certain segments of our lists, so only the most relevant will receive them. People get drip campaigns (e.g. free email marketing course) according to the actions they took on the site, guides they've downloaded or if they gave us specific information about them (e.g- indicated they're in SaaS or eCommerce). We also use a few things like timezone, geographical location, etc.
Talia Wolf
Personalization is a biggie. So far the best results I got come from good ol' email list segmentation. Learning to understand the preferences of the various potential groups of customers is your best shot at ensuring that your message is getting through. Top-notch copywriting and carefully crafted headlines will do the rest of the work. Coming across as easily "approachable"
Kas Szatylowicz
We ask users upon signup what they're interested in
As events, webinars, content arises that aligns with those interests, we segment groups accordingly. Not super deep personalization, but great to keep inboxes from overflowing.
Erin Simmons
For some of our promotional emails, we'll include first names. We're also able to segment emails based on job function, geography, industry, and any historical engagement with CMI, such as being an alumnus of our in-person events.
Cathy McPhillips
I personalize the content of our emails based on the newsletter the person subscribed to. For our weekly newsletter, I'll discuss a trending topic and share our latest blog posts and the articles we've read. For our new blog post emails, I'll share a summary of the blog post.
Alfred Lua
When I have time and a good idea. When we were giving away tickets for the latest edition of our conference, I sent emails to the winners with a number that associated with each of them. Also, I try to add a personal touch to our newsletters by adding GIFs with me and my colleagues.
Alex Tachalova
We segment our subscribers to send them messages according to their needs and interests. And of course, we use personalization tags such as the recipient's email address, name, website name in our messages.
Marcus Svensson
We do. We always use names, and as often as we can we'll take advantage of our topic-focused segments. B2B marketing, video marketing, SEO... We try our best to identify which contacts are most interested in each topic.
Josh Gallant
I only collect email addresses upon sign up but I use tags to build segments so I can send more interest-focused emails when needed.
Adam Connell
For new trial leads sign ups, I capture the level of SEO knowledge the sign up has and then send more relevant follow up sequences.
Joe Williams
So we mostly use personalization tokens in the email, based on their name, account activity (from the event tracking) when the emails are to be sent to a wider base. But when it comes to connecting personally - we prefer understanding the customer/subscriber well and based on that study we form lists and then send those personalized emails in clusters.
Manvi Agarwal
This depends on the list. For sites where I collect the name, then I tend to personalize the email. This works a bit like a pattern interrupt, which grabs a person's attention. On other email lists that I manage, I don't do much personalization. Instead, I focus on segmenting people on the list based on the average order value/ purchase history. This helps me to provide the most relevant offers to people.
Nico Prins

How do you track analytics?

Kas Szatylowicz
Moosend has a built-in "reports" feature that makes tracking my email campaign progress fast and easy.
Alex Tachalova
I use MailChimp analytics to keep an eye on the open and click rates. Plus, with the help of Google Analytics, I check whether there were any users that converted through the last-click attribution.
Marcus Svensson
Intercom comes with a built-in Messages Insights page that enables its users to get an overview of the performance of each email campaign.
Talia Wolf
We use Drip's analytics and are also integrated with Google Analytics and Teachable (our course platform).
Adam Connell
To track analytics I always use combination of my email provider (ConvertKit) and Google Analytics.
Joe Williams
ConvertKit has simple analytics but I mainly rely on Google Analytics for more detailed and Ecommerce metrics.
Manvi Agarwal
Using the analytics provided by the tool we use for email automation and besides that, we add UTM parameters to the links we add in the email to track how many people clicked and moved ahead.
Josh Gallant
Sadly ActiveCampaign's reporting is pretty basic (and just not good) on their lower-priced tiers. It's tough for us to consistently monitor engagement rates, but we do track traffic from email inside our Google Analytics. We also try to always attach UTM's to our links so we get campaign level data as well.
Nico Prins
I use the inbuilt analytics of the email management platform to track open rates and other stats.

How do you encourage users who are not active?

Incentives and highly personalized headlines never failed me. And Again - segmenting your email list and actually asking your subscribers about their expectations/needs/preferences is the foolproof way to deliver the content they look for.
Kas Szatylowicz
We realize that not all our recipients will be active that's why we create a segment with inactive ones and send them an email with an offer to help or inviting them to participate in a survey to find out what they would like to receive.
Marcus Svensson
Having an engaged list really matters, not a big one.
I do my best to make sure that every email I send provides huge value to people. When people ignore your emails, they're reducing your conversion rates. The size of the list doesn't matter, what matters is how many people engage with your content and use it. A smaller more engaged list has more value than a large number. So, we do a re-engagement campaign to anyone who hasn't been active over the past 3 months. I ask them to take some action to indicate they still want my content. If they don't respond, we automatically unsubscribe them.
Talia Wolf
Prior to Seer, at TomboyX (an eComm company), we used discounts and deals to entice users back into engaging with the brand. Using that as a simplified tactic for the overarching message - give your users something valuable to them. As a digital marketing company, can we provide a Power BI template that allows them to identify waste in their PPC account quickly? What can we give our users that provides value and helps them at the moment -- if we're not doing that, we don't deserve to be in their inbox in the first place.
Erin Simmons
We send out a version of our emails to unengaged users that is separate from our engaged users. We change up the times the emails are sent to see if that helps with engagement. After 90 days, we shift our daily unengaged users to our weekly messages.
Cathy McPhillips
If someone isn't engaging then we can use automation sequences to encourage users to become active again. That said, I've been on the fence about using this type of automation because as a user, I don't like being pushed to engage.
Adam Connell
We have an automated "win back" sequence that starts to send after a few months of inactivity. It's pretty simple — we tell them it's been a while since we've heard from them, share a few content assets they may be interested in, then ask them to click to confirm they want to stay subscribed. There's nothing worse than holding someone's email address hostage when they've clearly shown no interest in engaging with you. Don't be afraid to let them go!
Josh Gallant
It's always best to create a drip campaign to turn your inactive users to active. First of all before starting you got to figure out why they are inactive. What were their pain-points when they were with you, were you able to fit in their requirements, and do you see any potential in them coming back to you. When all of this is sorted, what would interest them to be back again with you, offering them some discount or an update would be the best way to make your users active.
Manvi Agarwal
For sign ups to a trial account, I unlock a relevant premium lesson based on interests already captured.
Joe Williams
I generally do this through a campaign. This involves offering people free resources. This is the best way to reactivate those who stop engaging with content.
Nico Prins
I don't really encourage them, I usually delete such users from the database. I believe that it's important to subscribe only those users who are actually interested in hearing from you rather than those that never open your mass emails. This affects the deliverability of your emails as the more emails go to spam the more chances you get to be labeled as an untrustworthy source.
Alex Tachalova
I think one of the best ways is to create great content that's relevant to our subscribers, which I can then share with them via emails. Crafting a good subject line can help re-engage subscribers, too.
Alfred Lua

What are your average open rate and click rate?

Kas Szatylowicz
My average open rate is 30% for my personal blog, and 18-20% for clients. Regarding click rate, it is 4-5% for my personal blog, and 2-4% for clients.
Alex Tachalova
Our average open rate is 44%. Actually, I'm pretty proud that some of our segments are getting such great open and click rates: they go far beyond the industry average benchmark. I highly appreciate our Digital Olympus community for supporting us, so keep opening our emails!
Marcus Svensson
I can say that average open rate of Albacross newsletters is 42%, and our average click rate is 6%.
Adam Connell
Average open rates for newsletters (not automation sequences) tend to be around 25-30% and CTR is around 5%.
Joe Williams
It depends on the type of email but for monthly industry news catch ups, these are around 25-30% open rate, and 3% click rate.
Manvi Agarwal
So our average open rate lies between 21 to 24% and click through rate ranging from 6 to 12%
Josh Gallant
Since cleaning our list earlier this year, we average between 30-40% open rates and 2-5% click rates on average. Before cleaning, each number was less than half of what it is today. We were hitting the spam folder big time.
Nico Prins
My average open rates vary by list. Generally, it's somewhere between 18% - 40%. The click through rate is usually lower at between 5%-20%. This varies depending upon the offer - what I'm trying to get them to click to - and the copy.

How do you fight spam? How to avoid being added to spam?

Primarily, we adhere to CASL, GDPR and other privacy acts, and are CAN-SPAM compliant. We don't add people to our database, even if they ask us to. We'll send them the subscription link for them to fill out themselves. All of our forms on our webinars and other lead gen opportunities all adhere to the rules and laws. We're transparent and consistent.
Cathy McPhillips
I usually use a spam score tool like Mail Test to help with deliverability. Regardless, I always send a test email to myself. The words used in an email can be enough to be added to spam, so this thing is important. And, I'm looking into email verification tools like Mailfloss to help avoid sending emails to spam traps, etc.
Adam Connell
If there were Olympic Games in email marketing, avoiding spam filters would be the most important competition. The first thing I do is asking new subscribers to add me to their address book. I also tend to use merge tags. I also always use branded graphics and content, never templates as spam filters tend to sometimes recognize this kind of content of the email as possible spam. And of course one cannot go far without A/B testing for all email campaigns.
Kas Szatylowicz
It depends a lot on the deliverability of your email software, but there are a few things we do to get a leg up. First, we try to create conversations rather than just blasting out emails and searching for click-throughs. If someone replies to your email, you're in the clear from the spam folder (and you might even make it the primary tab in Gmail). We also limit the amount of rich media, images, videos, etc to try to be as text-based as possible in the hopes of sending as a standard email.
Josh Gallant
People tend to send the received emails straight to the spam folder if the messages come too frequently and if they are irrelevant. These factors, as well as user segmentation, are our top priority.
Marcus Svensson
I try to avoid being added to spam by providing content that is relevant to our subscribers and by avoiding sending too many emails within a short timeframe.
Alfred Lua
We do the typical things to protect against spam: only send emails to folks who've opted-in, provide useful content without misleading subject lines, ensure we send the emails from an @seerinteractive.com email address that matches the links in our email, etc.
Erin Simmons
The first thing to look not to get spammed is taking care of the subject line. A generic subject line, or those with some offer are the first ones to go the spam folder. The more personalized or meaningful you are pertaining to your email, you avoid being added to spam.
Manvi Agarwal
For email capture, a double opt-in and honeypot form work. To help land in the main inbox and not promotions tab, I've installed DKIM, and reduce the number spam triggering words like "hidden", "secret", "free", "deal", "giveaway" and so on, within the content.
Joe Williams
Partly, I answered this question already. However, there's one more thing to mention. If you want to capture emails only from those users that want to stay in touch - have them go through a double opt-in. You'll capture fewer emails but, you should care more about quality rather than quantity.
Alex Tachalova
The best method I have is by setting expectations when a person signs up to a list. If people know what they are getting in for, then they will keep opening your emails. For example, on one of my email lists I've used the exact same subject line every week for months on end with no major fluctuation in the open rate. The reason the open rate remains stable is people know they are getting content which they find valuable each week.
The other thing that I do is regularly clean my lists.
Nico Prins

Share some useful lifehacks or give your advice

Kas Szatylowicz
One tip that I do not often see used is to experiment with different approaches to the opt-in forms. It is so common to invite everyone to leave their email address and wait to see if what we offer is suitable for a potential lead. It is far more unlikely to see a website/business that reverse-engineer this process by taking back control and choosing who can be the right match for them.

In short - we are using scarcity and exclusiveness as our strategy to draw highly qualified leads, letting them know that it's you choosing who can "join the tribe", even when it comes to free newsletters.

This strategy could be smartly used along with the regular email newsletter sign-ups. Skillful copywriting that speaks to the needs of your new audience can substitute the lead magnet incentive (if done well).
Alfred Lua
Buffer
The best way to create a newsletter that people enjoy is to keep testing and tweaking your emails. With each email you send, you'll gain a bit more understanding of what your audience likes (and dislike). You could even ask your subscribers directly for feedback and suggestions (which also creates an opportunity to connect better with your subscribers).
Cathy McPhilips
Content Matketing Institute
I'm not a big believer in hacks. Work hard, publish great content, do good work and be helpful to your customers.
Erin Simmons
Seer Interactive
Get a creative professional to design your template and teach you how to plug and play - this helps keep brand consistency and UX solid
Have a QA team - someone who checks links, someone with a creative eye to check images, someone who digs in on the copy. Splitting up jobs allows you to keep the workflow of the people you're asking for help low while making sure your audience receives a solid product. You as the builder of the email are going to miss A LOT if you just QA yourself. You're too close to it.
Alex Tachalova
Develop your own tone of voice and style. I think it's very important to make your users smile and let them feel your empathy. This way, they will be really looking forward to receiving your newsletters. Plus, try to minimize the number of promotional emails and focus on providing value. The companies that manage to add exclusive content to their emails have the highest click and open rates.
Marcus Svensson
Needless to say, not all content will be suitable for all subscribers. Thus, you should segment your audience into separate groups based on not only their interests but also on their position in the buying cycle. As a result, your readers will receive the most relevant emails, and you'll get your prospects to move forward in your sales funnel and prevent cases where they get stuck in the same stage of the buying cycle.
Adam Connell
Take stock of what aspects of your life inspire you and which aspects hold you back or create unnecessary fear. Do more of what inspires you and cut out things that can be damaging - such as mainstream media. One of the best things I've done is to cut out mainstream media. As a result, I'm happier, healthier, and more productive.
Joe Williams
The biggest one really is to segment your email list. This could be by their industry knowledge of your product or service that you offer. To do this, I'll place subscribers into one of three or four buckets when I capture their email details through a drop-down form, and then tag them in my email autoresponder. When I do this, it's easier to market in a more personal way which increases the conversion rate of a sale in the future.
Manvi Agarwal
In the emails we send, we mostly try to add our social media handles to show them that how active and engaging the business is. To show that you are active on social media, you need to create that presence and a tool like SocialPilot helps you automate your social media postings to make your social media marketing effortless. This helps the user with some credibility of your brand and helps them building trust.
Josh Gallant
Send emails you would want to receive yourself. If you're just blasting out boring links, you're not helping anyone. Strive to give your list things they can actually get value from.
Nico Prins
My number one piece of advice would be to focus on value. There are very few people who are interested in receiving updates about a new post you just wrote week in and week out. Rather align the emails you send with the outcome you want to achieve.
If people are interested in what you have to say they will always open your content, regardless of how infrequently you send a message. The second tip I have, which I mentioned earlier, is to set expectations. People want to know what they are signing up for. You can easily cover this through a welcome email campaign.

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Summary: checklist of a successful newsletter

Before sending your newsletters, check that your email complies with these requirements:
1
Your e-mail meets your goals and the needs of your recipients.
2
The subject line is short and motivates you to open the email.
3
If there is a possibility, then you write a personal greeting.
4
The content is well structured and understandable.
5
The e-mail is sent by a real person.
6
Use interactive elements only if they are displayed correctly.
7
Your readers will receive an ideal e-mail from Tuesday to Friday.
8
The e-mail also looks good on smartphones.
9
The spam score of your email is very low.
10
You included an unsubscribe link.
If you want to share your opinion or experience, please leave a comment under the article!

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